Why Wear Jordan 11 Retros?

Share this article on Facebook
Share this article on Twitter
Share this article on Linkedin
Share this article on Delicious
Share this article on Digg
Share this article on Reddit
Share this article on Pinterest

With the success of Space Jam movie, came in the demand for the stylish Nike Jordan 11 retro or Air Jordan 11. Right from the time these shoes were introduced, Jordan 11 Retro were promoted as the name was linked to the 95-1196 NBA champion, Michael Jordan. The famed star player wore them in the movie Space Jam and is thus popularly known as Space Jams.

Not only is Jordan 11 retro stylish but extremely comfortable also. Nike was known for high quality joggers and sports shoes but with the launch of the Jordan 11, they entered a different market- manufacturing shoes for a specific niche, basketball shoes. Nike expanded its clientele base and the instant hit of these shoes was a market booster.

In 1995 and later years, Michael Jordan rose to become a start basketball player and was paid nearly $2.5 million dollars to endorse products by Nike. Though colored shoes were not allowed by NBA, Michael Jordan was fined each time he wore the vibrant Air Jordan series on court. But the people loved seeing the colourful shoes on court instead of the usual white basketball shoes and Jordan 11 retro were an instant hit and owning a pair of these trendy shoes became a style.

Since then, each pair of original Jordan that was launched by Nike became a popular choice and a collectible. If you are looking to buy a pair of Jordan 11, there are numerous retail outlets and online stores that sell original Jordan shoes. However as numerous fakes are available at cheap prices, you need to be sure that you buy from a well known retailer.

Though the legacy and remarkable history of Air Jordan continues, the latest cutting edge technology and air in the sole gives you the bounce and speed necessary for playing. The cushioned sole also allows you to walk longer distances with the support available in the foot care designed shoes. Each shoe range that is designed by Nike in the Jordan range requires careful research and development and exclusive designers to provide you the best.

How to Calculate Window Tint Visible Light Transmission (VLT)

Window tinting films are measured in visible light transmission levels (or VLT). This means that when we discuss a particular film, be it for fitting to a car or any other application, we normally refer to it with it’s VLT value. VLT is measured in percentage ( % ), so if you hear about a tint product being referred to as a percentage, it is the VLT that defines that percentage value.

For example, a tinting film referred to as Charcoal 5% is a charcoal coloured tint with a VLT of 5% and likewise a film referred to as green 50% is a green coloured tint film with a VLT of 50%. But what does the number actually mean?

Well, in simple terms the VLT value is the percentage of visible light that will be allowed to travel through the window tinting film from the exterior face side of the film to the interior side. This means that a 5% film will only allow 5% light travel through and a 70% film will allow 70% light to travel. In effect, this means that lower VLT films will appear darker. For instance, it is normally 5% tints that we will see on limousines for privacy.

So, fitting a 5% tint to a window will allow 5% light to travel through the glass from outside to inside, right? NO! Because we need to take into consideration the actual VLT of the window before the tint is even installed. There is no such thing as a piece of glass, no matter how clear it appears, with a VLT of 100%. This is because glass naturally filters out a little bit of visible light.

Lets look at car window tinting as this is one area where we speak of VLT often due to the fact that many countries have laws in place limiting how dark car windows should be tinted. Most modern cars come from factory with windows reading a VLT somewhere between 72% and 78%, depending on manufacturer, model and country. Say, our example car’s windows read at 72% and we add a 50% window tinting film, what is the new and final VLT of our car’s windows after installation?

The sum is very simple: V1 x V2 = V3 (Where V1 is the original VLT of the glass before tinting, V2 is the VLT of the window tinting film and V3 is the final VLT value of the glass with tint film applied).

Our car’s windows original VLT = 72% and the tint = 50 %, thus V1 = 72 and V2 = 50

The sum is 72 x 0.50 giving us 36, which we will express as a percentage. So a window with an original VLT of 72% will then have a VLT of 36% after application of a 50% film.